Homepreschool and Beyond

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    Homepreschool and Beyond will give parents the knowledge they need to find “balance” for their family. Find out what young children need to know—and how to teach it. Gain the confidence you need to relax and enjoy those precious preschool years—and beyond.

    “Susan Lemons gives you the blueprint…”

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Archive for the ‘circle time’ Category

Circle Time for Preschool at Home/Homeschool

Posted by homeschoolmentormom on April 12, 2012


When I was a preschool teacher, I always felt that circle time was the highlight of the day.  As a homepreschooling mom, that feeling intensified.  It absolutely was the best part of our day–and still is.  I’ve heard that some moms object to the words “circle time”…they prefer the words “lap-time” or “mommy time” instead.  Whatever you call it, it’s tons of fun.

We actually do TWO circle times a day.  One is first thing in the morning (Bible time), and the other  is a little later in the morning (our unit study or story time.)

What do we “do” during circle time?  What makes circle time different from story time?  To me, the difference is the fact that circle time includes more than just stories.  Circle time traditionally includes various activities such as calendar, finger plays, music, and story time.

There is really no right or wrong way to do circle time; experiement and see what you and your children enjoy. But to give you some ideas, here’s what we did during our first circle time of the day with all our  preschoolers (Note:  We do pretty much the same with children of all ages):

1.  Worship/music:  Hymn of the month, praise and worship songs, Bible-memory songs, or Sunday-school type songs (the calmer ones.)

2. Bible memory work/catechism

3. Bible story and/or devotional.

4.  Prayer

Afterwards, we do our chores together and then play outside (weather permitting.) Next is morning snack, and then our second circle time. During our second circle time (unit study) we:

1.  Do calendar:  We sing “days of the week” and “months of the year” songs, add the day’s date to a pocket-chart calendar, figure out the current day of the week and month of the year, and recite the date while pointing to the calendar (“today is Monday, September 21, 2010.”)  (We would sing the months of the year song from Greg and Steve’s “We All Live Together” volume 2.)

2.  Have fun with finger plays, patriotic songs, folk songs, fun (active) Sunday school songs, silly songs, movement to music, rhythm band, and so on.  This is so fun, and gets all their wiggles out before story time starts.

3.  Story time

Sometimes we switch things around during our second circle time or add other activities, such as poetry (listening), picture study, or show and tell (my kids LOVE show and tell; it helps them practice their language/speech/oral composition skills);  we might even “practice being good” (act out appropriate behavior—see my book!)

Keeping Circle Time Fun

“Short and sweet” is really the trick to keeping circle time fun—as is alternating the more active parts of circle time with the quiet ones.  As an overall rule, it is better to leave your children wanting more versus frustrating them with too long of a circle time.  Other ideas:  Spice up your circle time with felt board activities/stories, Monkey Mitts, puppets, and other musical/finger play/musical props/learning props.

After story time, we move on to the rest of our daily routine.

Circle Time for Older Children 

We enjoyed circle time so much with our young children that we’ve simply continued it even when our children got older, with a few tweaks:

-Remember to change your content according to the children’s abilities, attention span, and interests.

-Parents of children who are in grades Kindergarten until grade three or so  should recite the flag salute at some time during the morning.  We chose to keep Bible first, since it is most important; we’d do the salutes and calendar right before our first “academic” subject of the day (math). Once they learned it, we discontinued it.

-We still use the same basic structure during our second circle time, but we call it “unit study time” with our older kids.  Our “unit study time” routine generally runs like this:  Drills/recitation (we’re used ABeka’s bird, insect and plant cards to memorize the most common critters/flowers in our area; we’ve also learnied to recognize the major instruments in the orchestra by sight.  Other times we’ve memorized the presidents in order or memorized the capitols.)   Next is music/singing (once the kids are older it’s great fun to learn longer folk songs and rounds.)  Afterward, we read aloud and discuss what we’ve read.

-We usually save our second circle time until Bible, math, and language arts are completed for the day.

-After our second circle time, we might work on a notebook page, a timeline card, an art project or a science/cooking experience that’s related to our unit, or we simply might be done for the day.

I hope this gives you some ideas for circle time at your house!

Blessings,

~Susan

© 2010, 2012 Susan Lemons all rights reserved.

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Finger Play Friday: There Was a Little Turtle AND Tiny Tim (song with motions)

Posted by homeschoolmentormom on December 23, 2011


NOTE: This finger-play is written out as I learned it.  I do not know its original source. Most finger-plays, like “mother goose” rhymes, have been passed down from mother-to-daughter or from teacher-to-teacher, with slight variations.  When finger-plays are included in books, the author is usually listed as “unknown” or “traditional.” If anyone knows the original source of this finger-play, please let me know so that I can give credit where credit is due.

There Was a Little Turtle

(NOTE: To make turtle, hold hands out with thumbs touching. Keeping hands in the same position, lay one hand on top of the other. There should be one thumb on both sides of your hands. To make “turtle” swim, twirl thumbs in a circle.)

There was a little turtle (make turtle, twirl your thumbs)

Who lived in a box (use pointer fingers to draw a box)

He swam in a puddle (use hands and arms to “swim”)

He climbed on the rocks (use hands to pretend to “climb.”)

He snapped at a mosquito, he snapped at a flea, he snapped at a minnow and he snapped at me. (say slowly; on the word, “snapped”, clap outwards like you are snapping at something)

He caught the mosquito, he caught the flea, he caught the minnow (do the same as you did on the word “snapped”)

But he didn’t catch me! (say phrase slowly and with emphasis; wag pointer finger from side-to-side)

(you can also SING this one; the tune is the same one that is used for Tiny Tim. <click to hear tune>)

Tiny Tim Song (with motions)

I had a little turtle, his name was Tiny Tim (make turtle as above)

I put him in the bathtub, to see if he could swim (make swimming motions)

He drank up all the water, he ate up all the soap (make eating motions)

And now he’s blowing bubbles, out of his tiny throat.

Bubbles, bubbles, bubbles………etc till at the end of the phrase, when you shout, “pop!”

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Finger Play Friday

Posted by homeschoolmentormom on November 11, 2011


NOTE: This finger-play is written out as I learned it.  I do not know its original source. Most finger-plays, like “mother goose” rhymes, have been passed down from mother-to-daughter or from teacher-to-teacher, with slight variations.  When finger-plays are included in books, the author is usually listed as “unknown” or “traditional.” If anyone knows the original source of this finger-play, please let me know so
that I can give credit where credit is due.

This finger play is great to use in fall–for Johnny Appleseed Day, things harvested in fall, etc.

Ten Red Apples

10 red apples grow on a tree (put both hands up and out to make a tree)

5 for you (hold out one hand, indicating “5”)  and 5 for me (repeat, with other hand)

Let us shake that tree just so (hold out hands and pretend to shake tree)

And 10 red apples fall down below (make 10 fingers fall down.)

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 (count each finger).

Posted in circle time, Finger Plays, Homepreschool, Homepreschool and Beyond, Homeschool, Homeschool Preschool, Homeschooling | Tagged: , , , | Leave a Comment »

Finger Play Friday

Posted by homeschoolmentormom on November 4, 2011


 This is one of the finger plays you might learn if you attend Gymboree with your children. You can also  hear it on Parachute Express’s CD, “Shakin’ It”.

Great Big Cat

There was a great BIG cat (hold hands out wide)

And a WEE little mouse (say “wee” in a high-pitched voice; hold pointer fingers close together to show how small the mouse was.)

Who ran around, and around (twirl hands around quickly)

In a high, high house (hold finger-tips together over head to make the roof-line of a house.)

Now, that WEE little mouse (say “wee” in a high-pitched voice; hold pointer fingers close together to show how small the mouse was.)

Got caught (begin to pretend to “catch” mouse by moving arms/hands together to scoop up mouse; clap hands together right after the word “last”) at last

Because the great BIG cat (hold hands out wide, emphasis on the word “big”)

Ran around (dramatic pause here-begin to twirl hands around)  and  around (dramatuc pause here; twirl hands faster)  sooo fast.  (hold out the word “sooo”, emphasize the word “fast”, saying it quickly, while twirling hands around quickly.)

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Finger Play Friday

Posted by homeschoolmentormom on October 28, 2011


NOTE: This finger-play is written out as I learned it. I do not know its original source. Most finger-plays, like “mother goose” rhymes, have been passed down from mother-to-daughter or from teacher-to-teacher, with slight variations. When finger-plays are included in books, the author is usually listed as “unknown” or “traditional.” If anyone knows the original source of this finger-play, please let me know so that I can give credit where credit is due.

Ten Red Apples

10 red apples grow on a tree (put both hands up and out to make a tree)

5 for you and 5 for me (hold out the five fingers of each hand one at a time.)

Let us shake that tree just so (hold out hands and shake them)

And 10 red apples fall down below (make fingers fall down.)

1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 (count each finger).

Naughty Hands

(This one is definitely politically incorrect, but I love it and think it is very appropriate!)

Sometimes my hands are naughty (hold our hands, then slap one with the other)

And so my mother says, that she will have to scold them (shake finger as if scolding)

And send them off to bed (fold hands in prayer stance, then place on side of head; lay head on fingers, turn head to one side as if resting on a pillow, shut eyes and pretend to go to sleep.)

So little hands, be careful, of everything you do (hold out hands and look at them–OR extend pointer finger and shake it)

Because if you are sent to bed, I must go there too! (point to self; then fold hands in prayer stance and place on side of head; lay head on hand, turn head to one side as if resting on a pillow, shut eyes and pretend to go to sleep.)

Posted in circle time, Finger Plays, Homepreschool, Homepreschool and Beyond, Homeschool, Homeschool Preschool, Homeschooling | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Finger Play Friday

Posted by homeschoolmentormom on October 21, 2011


NOTE: This finger-play is written out as I learned it.  I do not know its original source. Most finger-plays, like “mother goose” rhymes, have been passed down from mother-to-daughter or from teacher-to-teacher, with slight variations.  When finger-plays are included in books, the author is usually listed as “unknown” or “traditional.” If anyone knows the original source of this finger-play, please let me know so that I can give credit where credit is due.

Galloping Horses

10 horses galloped into town (start by holding your hands behind your back, then bring hands around to the front and “gallop” your fingers in front of you.)

5 where black (hold out right hand in front of you, as if you were motioning to stop)

And 5 where brown (repeat action with other hand.)

They galloped up (make hands “gallop” up)

They galloped down (make hands “gallop” down)

Then they galloped and they galloped right out of town! (“gallop” hands off to one hand.)

Posted in circle time, Finger Plays, Homepreschool, homeschool methods, Homeschool Preschool, preschool at home | Tagged: , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Finger Play Friday

Posted by homeschoolmentormom on October 14, 2011


NOTE: This finger-play is written out as I learned it.  I do not know its original source. Most finger-plays, like “mother goose” rhymes, have been passed down from mother-to-daughter or from teacher-to-teacher, with slight variations.  When finger-plays are included in books, the author is usually listed as “unknown” or “traditional.” If anyone knows the original source of this finger-play, please let me know so that I can give credit where credit is due.

5 Little Monkeys

5 little monkeys, swinging in a tree,

(hold up one hand for “5”, then hang hand down and “swing” it back and forth like a monkey hanging from a tree by it’s tail.)

Teasing Mr. Alligator “you can’t catch me—you can’t catch ME!”

 (put thumbs behind ears and mock the alligator by moving fingers back and forth)

Along came Mr. Alligator quick as can be,

(make an alligator by placing hands in the “prayer” position and then hold them straight out in front of body to make an alligator’s head; wiggle from side to side, so the alligator “swims”.)

And he snatched that monkey right out of the tree!

(use hands, still in “alligator” stance, to open and close with a clap right on the word “snatched”.)

Repeat, changing the number: 4 little monkeys swinging in a tree, and so on, counting down to zero. When you get to zero, you say:

Now there’s no more monkeys swinging in the tree

(old up fist to indicate “zero”, while shaking head, “no”.)

But here comes Mr. Alligator (put palms together to make alligator; make alligator “swim”)

As fat as he can be. (On the word, “fat”, hold arms out to sides to show a “fat” alligator body; rock arms and body from side to side, as if waddling.)

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Making Storytime Special

Posted by homeschoolmentormom on October 10, 2011


 (Classic repost, updated.)     

       Many years ago I had an experience I’ll never forget.  While visiting a friend’s house–a mother of preschoolers–I observed the following: Her little one brought her a book, and trundled onto her lap so that she could be read to. My friend pulled her up onto her lap, and started reading to her…but this was no ordinary story. It was the fastest story I’ve ever heard! There was no expression, nor any discussion of the book or its pictures. She read it as quickly as she could, just to get it over with. 

       I hope this wasn’t the usual way stories went at her house. I understand that she did have company, and she wanted to placate her child so that we could continue our visit. But the whole thing made me sad. It’s something I’ve never forgotten.

       Reading aloud should be a special time of bonding between parent and child. It should never be viewed only as an obligation—something to be rushed through at break-neck speed. Story time should be enjoyed…relished. 

       There are so many ways to make story time special. They are all simple, and so much fun!  Here are a few ideas:

 -Take your time and enjoy the story. Read a little more slowly than you think you need to. Enunciate your words clearly; your children copy your speech.

-Read with expression, and get into character: whisper, shout, growl, squeal, and make animal sounds as appropriate. Make male voices sound low, and female voices higher. Make each character as unique as you can–my boys love it when I add a southern accent for Hank the Cowdog.

-Encourage your children to chime in when there is a familiar or repetitive phrases.

-Pause at the end of phrases, to see if your child can fill in any missing words.   

-Try reading in new places:  How about a picnic read aloud time?  You can have a picnic indoors or out.  Maybe your little girls would enjoy a “tea time” reading. Read in different rooms, in your bed, in front of the fireplace, during bathtime, and so on. We love to read while snuggling on the couch, under a fluffy blanket.

-Try including pets or “loveys” (favorite blankets or stuffed animals) in your reading time.

-Extend your read-aloud time by acting out nursery rhymes and favorite stories, and watch your children’s play for signs that your read-aloud time is sinking-in: You’ll know you’ve found a gem of a book when your children include the book in their pretend-play spontaneously.

-Talk about the story:  Speculate: What might happen next? What could the character have done differently? Notice the details in the pictures, as they relate to the story. Ask your child to describe the characters:  What kind of dog is Harry? (A black dog with white spots.)  What is the one thing he doesn’t like?  (He doesn’t like taking a bath. These details are from one of our favorite books,  Harry the Dirty Dog, by Gene Zion.)

-Notice details in each book’s art: How are the pictures made? Are they drawn, painted, colored, or collaged (what is the medium used?) Notice the artist’s use of color and light as well.

-Have your child tell the story, or part of it, back to you (narration.) 

-Give your child a “print-rich” environment.  Keep books at your child’s eye-level, to encourage them to investigate books themselves—or pick out books that they would like to hear. We used plastic rain gutters to make bookshelves right by our boy’s beds and provided them with reading lamps to encourage them to read in bed.

-Choose books that are about topics that are of special interest to your children. Consider turning books/storytime into a daily or weekly unit study or “theme” by reading about one main topic at a time, and by adding fun activities/art projects/dramatic play, etc that enhances the reading experience.

-Communicate to your children that books are important to you.  Let your children see you reading books. Share books that you loved as a child with your children.

-Buy books as presents; give books as rewards (books are only rewards if they are GOOD books. Check out my archives for “book lists” and my post on  “Choosing and Finding Classic Picture Books”.)

-(For older children): Read a book, and then watch a movie based on the book.  How are they different? Which is better? Why?   

-Something we do: Quote special sentences/passages from favorite books (and movies) when appropriate. Ask your children if they remember which books the sayings are from, which character said it, how he said it, and so on.

      Don’t just read to your children—make reading special!

© 2010/2011 Susan Lemons all rights reserved. 

Posted in Book Lists, Challenge to Parents, circle time, Elementary School, Encouragement, Family Fun, Family Life, Homepreschool, Homeschool, homeschool methods, Homeschool Preschool, Homeschooling, Mothering, Parenting, Picture Books, preschool at home, Reading Aloud | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Finger-Play Friday

Posted by homeschoolmentormom on September 30, 2011


NOTE: This finger-play is written out as I learned it.  I do not know its original source. Most finger-plays, like “mother goose” rhymes, have been passed down from mother-to-daughter or from teacher-to-teacher, with slight variations.  When finger-plays are included in books, the author is usually listed as “unknown” or “traditional.” If anyone knows the original source of this finger-play, please let me know so that I can give credit where credit is due.

 10 Little Soldiers

 10 little soldiers, standing in a row. (Hold up ten fingers.)

When they see the captain, they bow just so. (Bend finger-tips only.)

They march to the left and march to the right (move hands to the left, then the right),

Then shut their eyes and sleep all night. (Fold hands in prayer stance, then place on side of head; lay head on hands, turn head to one side as if resting on a pillow, shut eyes and pretend to go to sleep. We usually add soft snoring sounds at this point.)

      Have fun, and remember, it is your confidence and enthusiasm that makes finger-plays “work” and come alive with fun!! ~Susan

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Felt Board Fun (Making and Using Your Own Feltboard and Figures)

Posted by homeschoolmentormom on October 13, 2010


     Special note:  I wrote this article years ago, and it originally appeared in Home School Enrichment Magazine.  It is re-printed with permission.  I added the pictures; they are from my own felt board sets.  Be sure to peek after the article for links to some of the resources I describe; a couple of the links are also embedded in the pictures. 

     A note to parents of school-aged children:  Felt board sets are also wonderful for older children; many of the companies listed below also sell sets designed for older children, so don’t skip this article! (there’s a human body set, for instance–put the organs in their proper place!) 

Pre-printed and pre-cut figures from the Family Worship felt set, from Little Folk Visuals

     Sunday school was always something I looked forward to when I was young. My two favorite things about Sunday school were the music and the stories. I always got excited when my teacher pulled out her felt board to illustrate—it made the story special. Sometimes, if we were especially good during the story, she would even choose some of us to put the figures up on the board—the ultimate reward.

     The felt board has been a traditional part of Sunday schools, preschools, and kindergartens for 50 years or more. When I was young, I had a small felt board set of my own at home, as did many of my friends. Nowadays, however, felt boards are nearly forgotten.

The Type of Felt Board Sets I Had as a Child

     Felt boards deserve to be saved from their untimely demise. They can be used for more than just illustrating stories; they can be used as serious early learning tools. Felt boards can do things that books can’t. They don’t just tell stories—they let your child participate in the story. Felt boards can be used to retell stories in new and creative ways, or to practice the sequence of the stories (what happened at the beginning? The middle? The end?) Felt boards can also be used for practice and reinforcement of new concepts, for games, and for other hands-on learning activities. They can be used to teach letters, numbers, shapes, colors, and much more—but most of all, they are fun!

A few pieces from my Beginner's Counting Set from Little Folks Felt--

     Felt boards and felt board sets can be purchased pre-made—you can even buy the figures pre-cut and pre-colored so that they are ready to go—but what fun would that be? It’s cheaper and more fun to make your own. And when you make your own, you will be able to customize your sets according to your children’s needs and interests. 

Homemade set; the pattern is from "Felt Board Fun" by Liz and Dick Wilmes

     Making your own felt board and felt board figures is easy—and doesn’t take many supplies. You don’t even have to be artistic. If you can trace lines and color, you can make your own felt board figures.

     If you are interested in making some felt fun for your children, you need to learn a couple of secrets.

     The first secret: felt boards aren’t covered with felt. A real “felt” felt board quickly frays and pills, turning quite ugly. The best covering for a felt board is actually flannel.  Another secret: not all felt board pieces are made of felt. The best material for homemade pieces is pellon. Pellon, otherwise known as interfacing, is used to stiffen and reinforce clothing (especially around the collar and button areas). It is available anywhere fabric and sewing notions are sold. The pellon you choose should be thick and smooth—and not the iron-on variety.

Making Your Own Felt Board

     If you can wrap a present, you can make your own felt board quickly and easily. Here is what you will need:

     •  Particle board or some other thinly cut board, in whatever size you choose (even heavy cardboard will work in a pinch). I like my boards to measure around 20” x 25”. For church use, bigger is better. For a personal felt board, 14” x 14” is a fun size.

     •  A yard or so of blue flannel to cover the board. 

     •  Masking tape or staple gun

     To make the felt board, simply wrap the board in flannel, in the same way you would wrap a present. Lay two layers of the flannel on a table or other hard surface, smoothing out all the wrinkles. Next, center the board on top of the flannel. Pull the flannel over to the back of the board, one side at a time. Tape or staple it in place. Next, do the opposite side, checking to be sure that the flannel is not wrinkled. Continue until all the sides are secured.  

To make your own felt board figures you’ll need:

     •  Pellon (start with ¼ to ½ a yard)

     •  Sharpie brand permanent markers (especially black ones)

     •  Oil pastel crayons (I like Cray-Pas brand)

     •  Sharp scissors (small ones work best)

     •  Patterns or ideas for your figures. There are several different options for this—picture books, pictures cut from a magazine, or felt board pattern books (my choice). My favorite pattern book is Felt Board Fun for Everyday and Holidays by Dick Wilmes, Liz Wilmes, and Donna Dane (you can find it on http://www.amazon.com). You might be able to find other, older pattern books that include felt board stories at your local library. An example of what you might look for is the book Story Telling with the Flannel Board, Book One, by Paul S. Anderson (there are at least three volumes).

"A Color of His Own"--homemade figures

      To make your own felt board pieces, use a pattern from one of these felt board books or  use a simple children’s book such as A Color of His Own by Leo Lionni (trace only the chameleons), or Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What do You See? by Bill Martin for a pattern. Lay the pellon over the picture you want to recreate. Use a Sharpie brand pen to trace over the lines, leaving out any intricate detail.*  If you are making a story, it’s a good idea to number the pieces in the order they will be used. Next, color the pieces as desired with the oil pastels. Cut around the pieces and they are ready to go.  

     Another option: save catalog and magazine clippings and use rubber cement to glue a piece of pellon onto the back of them; this makes an instant felt board piece. 

     I put my finished pieces into labeled zipper bags, or into file folders that I staple along three sides. 

 Using Your Felt Board

     Letters, numbers, shapes, and animals are great first felt board pieces to make. Use them to practice counting and to match numerals to sets. (For example, make one cow, two ducks, three dogs, and so on; have your child find the animals that are alike, and then put the correct number by each set of animals.) A really fun idea is to make a farmer and various animals to illustrate the song “Old MacDonald Had a Farm.” (The patterns for these are in Felt Board Fun for Everyday and Holidays.)

     You can create a fun game by making small, medium, and large-sized apples. Find any simple apple pattern and enlarge or reduce it on a copy machine. Draw a simple worm or caterpillar, too. To play the game, place the apples on the board. Ask your child to point to the large apple, the medium-sized apple, and the small apple. Next, show your child the worm. Tell him that worms love to eat apples. Have your child close his eyes while you hide the worm under one of the apples. When your child opens his eyes, have him guess which apple the worm is eating: is he hidden under the large, medium, or small apple?  To extend this activity, have your child place the worm on the apple, under the apple, below the apple, beside the apple, and so on. 

Other Activities

With letters:

     •  Make the alphabet letters, then have your child match upper and lower   case. 

     •  Put the letters in alphabetical order. 

     •  Pick out letters and name them.

     •  Pick out letters and say their sound.

     •  Pick out letters and spell their name.

     •  Beginning readers can use the letters to practice word families. Put up the letters “a” and “t.”. Read “at,” then add sounds at the beginning of the word to change it (add “c” to spell “cat” and so on).

With numbers:

     •  Point to the numbers and practice counting, and later, skip counting.

     •  Label objects/sets with the correct number.

With shapes:

     •  Name the shapes.

     •  Make structures and designs with the shapes.

     •  Put the same shapes into a set.

     •  Put the same color shapes into a set.

With stories:

     •  Tell the story to your child, and then have him tell it to you, putting the appropriate figures on the felt board.

     •  Retell the story in a creative way, changing a dog for a cat, etc, or changing the ending. 

With finger plays:

     •  It is simple to make figures to illustrate finger plays such as Five Little Ducks, Five Little Monkeys, Five Green and Speckled Frogs, etc. You can also number the figures so that your child can see the count down.

For creative play:

     •  Let your child make up his own stories and play with the felt board. This works especially well when you use themed sets (Christmas figures, pre-made Bible figures, and so on).

     The felt board is a great tool that parents can use to teach their children valuable skills in a fun, game-like way.  I hope you will try some felt-board fun with your children. 

*(An extra note about copying pictures directly from books:  Make sure the pen doesn’t bleed through the pellon to the book.  If you are worried that it will bleed through, your solution is to trace the pattern onto plain white tissue paper with a pencil or regular ink pen.  Then lay your pattern onto the pellon.  Use a Sharpie pen to trace over the pattern; it will bleed through to the pellon and make your pattern.)

This article is copyrighted to Home School Enrichment Magazine and is used with permission.  Pictures and extra text © 2010 Susan Lemons, all rights reserved.

Links:

Felt Board Fun for Everyday and Holidays, by Liz and Dick Wilmes (I haven’t seen their other felt board books, but would guess that they are great, too!  This is my all-time favorite felt resource book.

Story Telling with the Flannel Board, by Paul S. Anderson (there are 3 volumes to this; they are old and out of print.  I don’t like every story in this series, but many of them are considered “classics” or “staples” in preschool classrooms.)

Betty Lukens Felt

Little Folk Visuals

The Felt Source

Story Time Felt

Free Online Resources:

Tutorial with pictures–making your own flannel board: Maya Made 

Preschool Printables: Printable felt board patterns/stories

Billy Bear 4 Kids:  Printable felt board patterns/stories

DTLK’s printable felt stories

Other Articles/Ways to Use Feltboards in your homeschool: (remember, they do make felts for older children, too!)

The Feltboard is Your Friend

Check out You Tube for more ideas–making flannel boards and figures, and how to use them!

Remember:  The the best boards are made of flannel, not felt.  You can glue pellon, felt, velcro, or sand paper to paper pictures and they will stick to your board.  Of course, you can use felt board pieces, too!

Final tips:  In addition to pellon, you can purchase milk filters from dairy supply stores for making your figures.  They are heavy and stiff, and pre-cut in a medium-sized circle shape.  Don’t forget to color your figures with Sharpies and Cray-Pas (oil pastels!)

  And most of all…have fun!

      ~Susan

Posted in circle time, Felt Board Fun and Learning, Finger Plays, Flannel Board/Felt board, Homepreschool, Homeschool | Tagged: , , , | 12 Comments »